Raising a Turkey for Thanksgiving

YOU GUYS. We did it. I still can’t believe it, but we did. We brought home a little fluff ball in June that became the star of Thanksgiving dinner last Thursday.PSX_20151201_171049

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It was both easier and harder than I expected. Rest assured, it was
absolutely more expensive. Between the cost of the chicks ($10-$12 a pop), the grandiose shelter they just had to have but refused to use, and the exorbitant amount of feed they went through… Well, I think you get the picture.Red Bourbon

Raising them to maturity came with its fair share of headaches, too. In the end, only 1 of the 5 Red Bourbon Heritage chicks and the 1 Broad Breasted Bronze we purchased survived. The heritage breeds are generally known for being more fragile than the BB varieties, but many a night was spent cuddling Fat Amy back to life because he couldn’t figure out how to simply step out of the rain into the heated shelter. There’s something to be said for the “dumbing down” that happens though selective breeding.

It was really interesting to see the differences raising a heritage and a BBB along side one another. The Bourbon was definitely more “wild,” and retained much more of her natural instincts. They were both full of personality, but we couldn’t help but favor the BBB. I’m certain it was because he was a Tom. Fat Amy’d gobble at everything – a passing car, the lawn mower, a C-130 flying overhead, Fat Amyan unexpected breeze… you name it. He was single-mindedly obsessed with trying to attack the dog, despite repeatedly having walked away with fewer feathers than he started with, and would even start wars with her through the back door. (Baby Jesus bless that dog’s patience. She will ascend to sainthood. I’m certain of it.) He would side-eye everyone and everything, and was constantly strutting for his lady. With all that bravado, it was impossible not to love-hate him. Bourbon

While we would prefer heritage breeds for a number of reasons, next year we will be sticking to BBBs. Flighty Heritage breeds are not conducive to neighborhood living. Trust me on this. We’ll have to save that for a time when we’re a real farm and not a house with a yard in a residential area.

The Bourbon came out to 16.8 lbs live weight, 13 lbs dressed, which is pretty standard for a heritage hen. She went to freezer camp for another day. On that note, the neighbor kids have started asking about her. Who wants to tell them?

For those of you who follow our Facebook page, you saw that Fat Amy topped the scales at 44.5 lbs, and dressed out to an epic 36 lbs. Which amounts to entirely too much turkey, if you’re wondering. We had to special order an XXL roasting pan, which he only just fit in. He barely fit in the oven and took 7 hours to cook, when it was all said and done.

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After God only knows how many cheers around the table in his honor, the happiest Thanksgiving turkey that ever was fed the happiest urban farmers that ever were, their friends and their family.

Framily

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And then there were leftovers. And more leftovers. And more leftovers…

Turkey sandwiches, turkey tacos, turkey salads, turkey scrambled eggs, turkey soup, as well as 3 turkey pot pies and 4 trays of turkey enchiladas for the freezer. So if you invite me to a potluck any time soon, you know what you’re getting.

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(Pssst tell me your favorite leftover turkey dish in the comments)