5 Easy Ways to Help Bees this Summer

It is an unavoidable reality. Our bees are in trouble. As we become increasingly aware of the issues facing our pollinators and the detrimental impact their decline will have on our local and global food supply, we’re all looking for ways to help. Here are five EASY ways to help local bee populations that take very little time, effort and money.

5. Put out a water dishIMG_0652

Bees are thirsty! They seek out shallow water sources to replenish from, so consider putting out a saucer of fresh water in your garden or on your patio. If you keep it full, in a few days time you will find that you have regular visitors. Bees are notoriously bad swimmers, though, so if you’re using something larger like a bowl or have a bird bath, consider putting a rock or some pebbles for the bees to perch on to drink safely.

4. Plant flowers

Bees are starving; one of the best things you can do to immediately benefit local pollinators is plant food in the form of annual or perennial flowers, as well as flowering trees and shrubs.IMG_0551 Plant in clumps, choosing  flowers of a variety of colors and shapes that bloom at different times throughout the year. Choose flowers native to your area. Native plants naturally occur in the region in which they evolved and subsequently, have additional advantages. They are adapted to local soils and climate conditions, typically require less water and are more often resistant to harmful insects and disease. Additionally, wildlife evolves with plants; therefore, local pollinators have a strong preference for native flowering plants.

Just be sure you do not purchase flowers that have been sprayed with neonics!

PhotoGrid_1432300694885It can be a devastating realization for someone that they may have inadvertently killed or weakened the bees they were trying to benefit by purchasing pollinator-attracting plants from a large retailer or major nursery. Home Depot and Lowe’s have recently made this easier on consumers by voluntarily labeling their plants. Albeit it is in tiny font, tucked away at the base of the plant on a separate, hard to spot, easy to dislodge secondary label, but it’s there. Usually. Unfortunately, the majority of their plants are still currently treated but, in response to customer demand, both major retailers have announced plans to phase out neonic treated plants by 2019. So, in the mean time, be vigilant.

3. Reduce or eliminate use of pesticides, herbicides and fertilizers at your home

Science has proven time and time and time and time again these are harmful to bees. Specifically, neonicotinoids (neonics) and glyphosate, found in the ever popular RoundUp. Not only are these killing bees, they are harmful to you and your children and are contaminating our soil and water supply. Please stop using them. Seek alternative methods. Pull the weeds by hand, or BONUS: if they flower, just leave them. Bee food.

2. Buy LocalIMG_1413a

Local fruits and veggies, local meat and, of course, local honey! Get to know your farmer/grower/beekeeper. Ask them questions; go visit their property with your children. In addition to supporting pollinators, buying local reduces emissions, leaving you cleaner air and water, helps strengthen your local economy, and bolster your community’s knowledge, health and ecological longevity.

1. Encourage and educate others

We can talk about wide spread regulation of pesticides and grand conservation efforts all we want, and trust me that is being done at length, but that takes time. The quickest way to make a positive impact is to start now in your own community.Talk to your coworkers and the individuals at your place of employment responsible for lawn care; talk to your neighbors and friends about reducing pesticide use and planting pollinator friendly landscaping. Take time to understand how our actions such as urbanization and suburban landscape, the loss of biodiversity through monocrop agricultural practices and pesticide use collectively impact bee populations and how our choices as individuals and communities play a roll in that.

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